Airfix Logo

Humbrol Logo

The Airfix Tribute Forum was established in April 2006 to discuss the making of Airfix models.

Email: admin at airfixtributeforum.co.uk

It is currently Thu 24 Jul 2014 11:42 am

All times are UTC [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 14 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Churchill Crocodile
PostPosted: Mon 01 May 2006 17:31 pm 
Offline
Three Gold Stars
Three Gold Stars
User avatar

Joined: Sat 22 Apr 2006 10:12 am
Posts: 8154
Location: Norfolk, UK
: Moderator
: Group Build Guru
: Group Build Leader
: Model Portfolio
: Airfix Modelling SIG Member
Unfortunatly, there is no fuel trailer present...

Image

Image

Image
Mucklebourgh

_________________
Owen
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

Airfix Modelling SIG Member
Beyond the Box SIG Member


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue 25 Jul 2006 22:01 pm 
Offline
Site Owner
User avatar

Joined: Sat 22 Apr 2006 07:32 am
Posts: 51746
Location: Northampton UK
: Site Owner
: Administrator
: Group Build Guru
: Group Build Leader
: Model Portfolio
: IPMS Member
: Airfix Modelling SIG Member
Image
Image
Image

Bovington Tank Museum

_________________
and was Jerusalem, builded here
The new No. 2
Airfix Club 500287
IPMS 10983
My Portfolio My Workbench


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed 16 Feb 2011 21:28 pm 
Offline
Blue Star
Blue Star

Joined: Tue 21 Oct 2008 21:29 pm
Posts: 595
Location: Philadelphia, USA
For many years this example of a Churchill VII Crocodile has been outside the Musee Memorial de la Bataille de Normandie (Blvd Fabian Ware, 14400 Bayeux, France). Over the years I’ve seen it in a few different hews. In the 90s it was painted bronze green, but more recently a cold looking olive coat has been applied.  
    Following its liberation, the Royal Engineers built a ring-road around Bayeux to facilitate the movement of supplies – and anyone who has visited Bayeux will, no doubt, be able to attest to its roads’ incompatibility with 3 tonner or 10 tonner trucks) and the museum is on this (in the south west quadrant).
    The flame-fuel trailer has long since disappeared from this Crocodile, as have all the fenders and mudguards. This thread already has some good photos of the tank. I am here adding some detail shots of the tank/trailer link and the hose attached to the underside.

Image
This photo of the full back of the tank with the coupling nozzle was taken in 1992, or so, before an inconvenient hedge was planted around most of the tank. Today, the hedge remains to annoy photographers, both professional and amateur. I reckon that this photo also portrays where the break would be when trailers were decoupled.  

Image
This photo shows detail of the coupling. Moving in reverse order (from left to right), opposite what the flow of the fuel would be, you may see the pipe following up the rear of the Churchill's hull and entering the coupling. Then comes the hinge that allows for range left and right, following is the hinge for up and down movement (the circular part with the raised print on it).  

Four-hundred imperial gallons (1,800 l) of fuel and cylinders of compressed nitrogen propellant, enough for eighty one-second bursts, were stored in a 6.5 ton detachable armoured trailer towed by the Crocodile. The trailer, connected to the tank by a three way armoured coupling, could be jettisoned from within the tank if the fuel was spent and the trailer was no longer needed or if damaged. Unit transport vehicles could then use a tow bar to retrieve the trailers and return them to service.  

Image
Here is a photo of the pipe disappearing into its protective sheath that runs the length of the underside until the pipe disappears into the hull of the tank. I was not able to determine its composition, but I venture that it is a piece of thick mild sheet metal.  

Crocodiles did not make an appearance on D-Day, but soon after they became operational with the 79th Armoured Division. The flamethrower equipment was produced as a kit that Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers (REME) workshops could fit in the field, converting any available Churchill Mk VII. The conversion kit consisted of the trailer, an armoured pipe (so Geoffrey Futter claims in "The Funnies") fitted along the underside of the tank, and the projector, which replaced the hull mounted Besa machine gun. The Crocodile was therefore still able to function as a gun tank with its turret Ordnance QF 75 mm gun and coaxially mounted Besa.

Image
Looking down the business end. There is a small pipe housed here within that was heated and then spayed with petrol causing the ignition that would start the fuel proper to ignite. The fuel was also projected unlit - which, evidently, allowed it to splash about a bit more freely than when ignited. Either would be a fearful prospect for the unfortunate recipients.  


Image
For the benefit of the super-detailer, here is a photo of the right-hand side of the flame-projector nozzle. For the criminally insane super-detailer - the sun has caught the thread-work if an itsy bitsy spider, which she has anchored to the front of the nozzle.  

Image
Here is a feature for the serious modeller; the underbelly. Unfortunately, the example in Bayeux does not afford a reasonable underside angle to the photographer not equipped with an entrenching tool and a fair amount of nerve.

The Bayeux Crocodile has an early Mk VII turret, which can be identified by virtue of the "collar" running round the turret bottom and the absence of "cheeks" either side of the main gun aperture. My own anecdotal survey of Normandy photos leads me to believe that the later type Mk VII turret did not appear on Crocodiles until later in the war.
    Flamethrower personnel of any army were never popular with the enemy. Crocodile crews could expect no quarter if trapped or (temporarily) captured. Apparently, Crocodile units were always used with ample infantry support in well coordinated attacks. I'm unaware of an instance where a Crocodile was captured by the Germans.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu 19 Jul 2012 22:02 pm 
Offline
Silver Star
Silver Star
User avatar

Joined: Thu 09 Jun 2011 16:13 pm
Posts: 1454
Location: south coast
This machine has seen better days, it's lost most of it's thin steel parts like, the track guards ect. But it is interesting to look at all the same.
Image
Image
Image
Image

_________________
get that Halftrack to the other side of the canal you maniac!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu 19 Jul 2012 22:06 pm 
Offline
Silver Star
Silver Star
User avatar

Joined: Thu 09 Jun 2011 16:13 pm
Posts: 1454
Location: south coast
the hull hatches and attachments...
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image

_________________
get that Halftrack to the other side of the canal you maniac!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu 19 Jul 2012 22:08 pm 
Offline
Silver Star
Silver Star
User avatar

Joined: Thu 09 Jun 2011 16:13 pm
Posts: 1454
Location: south coast
the forward external features of the flame gun
Image
Image
Image

_________________
get that Halftrack to the other side of the canal you maniac!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu 19 Jul 2012 22:11 pm 
Offline
Silver Star
Silver Star
User avatar

Joined: Thu 09 Jun 2011 16:13 pm
Posts: 1454
Location: south coast
the very complicated running gear and tracks
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image

_________________
get that Halftrack to the other side of the canal you maniac!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu 19 Jul 2012 22:13 pm 
Offline
Silver Star
Silver Star
User avatar

Joined: Thu 09 Jun 2011 16:13 pm
Posts: 1454
Location: south coast
details on the rear side
Image
Image
Image

_________________
get that Halftrack to the other side of the canal you maniac!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu 19 Jul 2012 22:23 pm 
Offline
Silver Star
Silver Star
User avatar

Joined: Thu 09 Jun 2011 16:13 pm
Posts: 1454
Location: south coast
I read somewhere that these flame thrower Churchills were extremely effective against bunkers and gun emplacements, but they were feared and hated by the Germans. If they captured the crew of one of these they were likely to shoot them.

_________________
get that Halftrack to the other side of the canal you maniac!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu 19 Jul 2012 22:27 pm 
Ayup Dave...

Really nice Pics mate. In the second picture down, what or where is the Hole supposed to be ? do youknow. It'sdoing my Head in to think what or where it may be. Thanks if you can remember.


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu 19 Jul 2012 23:12 pm 
Offline
Red Star
Red Star
User avatar

Joined: Wed 23 Nov 2011 11:19 am
Posts: 337
Location: Dorset
Ay up Feanor

The rectangular hole on the side sponson would normally be covered by a 'boxy' housing and is an air inlet to the engine (one on either side).  There are pictures in osprey vanguard 13 of a Mk1 with them removed to ease it fitting onto an LCT

hope thats the hole you are referring to :D

cheers matey

Phil

_________________
Knife, Solvent, Filler, Paint ..... Check......Let's build that bad boy!

My Portfolio

My Work In Progress


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu 19 Jul 2012 23:12 pm 
Offline
Silver Star
Silver Star
User avatar

Joined: Thu 09 Jun 2011 16:13 pm
Posts: 1454
Location: south coast
hello mate, the second picture down is a general view of the rear of the tank, do you mean the second picture of the flame gun? the hole is the muzzle of the flame gun inside it's armoured shield

_________________
get that Halftrack to the other side of the canal you maniac!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon 20 Aug 2012 19:44 pm 
Offline
Silver Star
Silver Star
User avatar

Joined: Thu 09 Jun 2011 16:13 pm
Posts: 1454
Location: south coast
a particularly cheeky someone thinks he's commanding a Crockodile
Image

_________________
get that Halftrack to the other side of the canal you maniac!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Churchill Crocodile
PostPosted: Fri 04 Oct 2013 11:11 am 
Offline
Bronze Star
Bronze Star

Joined: Thu 02 Apr 2009 09:06 am
Posts: 960
Location: Melbourne, Australia
This is an ex-Australian Army Churchill Crocodile and trailer at the Australian Army Tank Museum, Puckapunyal. It is an unusual vehicle in that it is a Mark VIII with a 95mm howitzer.

Trailer:

Image

Churchill trailer coupling. Note that the coupling would normally be inside the armoured housing on the draw bar and not pointing skywards as shown.

Image

Turret offside. Note casting number on turret side and stowage box cutout to clear engine deck hatch.

Image

_________________
. . . on weekends I perform miracles,
I turn paycheques into wine. (Tex Perkins)


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 14 posts ] 

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group

The Airfix Tribute Forum

The Airfix Tribute Forum - Est. 2006 | Make a Donation


modelsforsale.com